Let’s Talk Vegan Periods | Making Your Period More Sustainable (AD)

Monday, 7 October 2019


sustainable and vegan tampons and pads


The concept of waste free living is a difficult one to wrap your head around. How can we do it? How, in a society which relies so much on consumerism and ease, can any of us possibly live a life with zero waste at all? And it’s about as difficult as it sounds. Living a waste free life and avoiding single-use plastic altogether is incredibly difficult to do, which is why cutting down on using plastics in the areas where we’re able to is a positive start.

I’m slowly trying to cut single-use plastics out of my life, but there are some areas which have proven to be more difficult for me than others. Sure, skipping out on Boots meal deals every day and sticking a packed lunch in a plastic tub is a relatively easy change, but what about the more difficult things which we have to use every day? What about daily essentials like contact lenses and sanitary products, where swapping them out for alternatives seems a lot more difficult? This last one, the waste that comes from sanitary products, has stumped me since becoming vegan; and is one which sustainable companies like Natracare are trying to help combat.

How can I make my period more sustainable?


Like many, it’s only very recently that I’ve started to consider just how much plastic waste I must be creating from my periods each month. Depending on your cycle length, the amount of tampons or pads you use in a month may vary. But it very quickly adds up when you consider the amount of packaging and the number of applicators each of us throws away during our time of the month.

In fact, research sourced by Natracare shows that women use more than 11,000 disposable menstrual products in their lifetime. When it comes to plastic waste, menstrual products are a huge contributor, reportedly being the 5th most common item found on European sea shores. That’s a scary finding and something that none of us should feel guilty about. It’s something we shouldn’t feel like we must combat alone, but we should all be trying to reduce if we’re able to.

The reason I’ve started to think about the plastic waste from periods more recently is because earlier this year I decided to have the contraceptive implant put in, which has resulted in me having far longer and far more regular periods. Meaning even more waste. I wanted to find a solution which would make my period more sustainable and less wasteful, without putting me in any discomfort or pain. Periods are a tough time of the month for all of us who get them, and there’s a balance to be found between being sustainable, but still putting our bodies needs first.

There are a lot of different products out there which can be used as sustainable solutions to having a less wasteful period. From cups to reusable pads, some products seem scary and some seem like a step away from our norms. But these products all have the same goal: periods without the waste. This, for me, is where companies like Natracare are my saving grace. The perfect harmony of ease and comfort with less waste in the process.

sustainable and vegan tampon packaging

How are companies like Natracare helping to make periods more sustainable?


Natracare are an organic menstrual product company, selling tampons and pads which are organic, non-toxic, sustainable and ethical. With products made from renewable, biodegradable and compostable materials (including organic cotton, compostable bioplastics and wood pulp), Natracare offer the world’s first alternative to conventionally produced menstrual products.

Not only are Natracare’s menstrual products organic and sustainable, they’re also cruelty free and vegan! So as well as being better for the planet, they’re better for the animals we share it with too.

As a company, Natracare are doing their best to make their entire process sustainable. Where possible, the majority of their products don’t contain plastic. They operate from a HQ which is powered by 100% renewable energy and they’re constantly working to make their creation process more sustainable. For me, companies like Natracare who are offering no fuss solutions to waste free periods are the future.

Natracare’s products range from applicator free tampons and tampons with cardboard applicators, to plastic free pads and liners and biodegradable wipes. They have a range of different products, each organically made and with a focus on involving less waste than you’ll find in most popular brand sanitary products.

Can we live without applicators?


For me, applicator tampons feel easier and cleaner than other sanitary products. It can be scary to consider straying away from a product which feels like the easiest option, and often this is why we do opt for products which are the least sustainable option.

For some people who may live with disability, using an applicator makes tampons more accessible and easier to use. But the good news is that there are products out there to help combat this, such as reusable applicators. You only need to buy one and this can be used alongside a more sustainable tampon brand, such as Natracare. Same ease, less waste.

Sustainability doesn’t have to be scary and it doesn’t have to be something we do all at once. Living a less wasteful life is something which we can all attempt, and brands like Natracare are paving the way in making this a little bit easier for consumers. It’s the small changes you make in your day to day which will help to make the biggest difference incrementally for our planet.


This is a sponsored post and I have received payment from companies mentioned within it, however I have not been asked what to write and all opinions are my own.

1 comment

  1. I'm trying to cut down on my plastic usage, and as I can't use tampons never mind diva cups, I always feel incredibly guilty when I get my period, and I've been trying to research sustainable alternatives. I'm definitely going to look more into the company now knowing they offer plastic free pads! Thanks for sharing this post!

    Gail | www.sherbet-aurora.co.uk

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